Siggi Eggertsson, the Jigsaw Puzzle Impressionist

Siggi Eggertsson is a young graphic designer/illustrator, with already a huge amount of work under his belt.
Born in Akureyri, a small town on the north coast of Iceland in 1984, Eggertsson was raised by his mother, who is also an artist. When Siggi was 15 years old, he started to “fool around” with design programs, making posters for music concerts and art exhibitions.
To quote Lou Reed & John Cale (from their Andy Warhol tribute “Songs for Drella”): “When you’re growing up in a small town/You know that you want to get out”. There was indeed no Picasso or Michelangelo coming from Akureyri, so when Eggertsson was 18 he was getting a bit bored and applied for the Graphic Design Dept. of the Iceland Academy of the Arts. He got accepted, so he moved to Reykjavík.
To broad his horizons, Siggi did an internship at the New York design studio Karlssonwilker, lived and worked in Berlin before ending up in London.
Eggertsson quickly started to make a name for himself in international design, art and media circles. In 2006, Print magazine ranked him as one of the 20 most promising designers under 30 years old. His works have also been featured in many books and magazines as Computer Arts, Clark and Dazed & Confused.

Eggertsson’s influences are varied and eclectic, from ancient Viking, Egyptian and Roman art, classical painters like Matisse, Legér and Picasso to the current music scene. He also feels inspired by people as Stefan Sagmeister, Peter Saville, Robbie Williams and Vincent Gallo – the way they think, their lifestyles and their approaches to creativity.

Siggi had the luck to do projects for bands as Zoot Woman, The Delays, Gnarls Barkley, … and open-minded brands as H&M, Nike and Stüssy. Still he feels that his self-initiated work is more important than anything else. It’s where he can experiment and push his style in new directions.
During his stay in Berlin, he created his own version of the cityscape in true Impressionist tradition but instead of taking a canvas outside, he created his artwork directly on his computer.

Eggertsson has a very simple yet very original and recognizable style. He begins an illustration with a sketch on grid paper, and adds abstraction and color later, fusing linear into pixilated shapes. His muted take on geometric & symmetric shapes and curving lines results in impressionistic jigsaw puzzles. Very ‘fresh’ and ‘now’, glorious pop art for the years 2000. “It’s still developing and I’m really interested in how far I can take the style,” he tells. We’re curious & looking forward to see his new work and projects.

Berlin, En Plein Air
“I’ve drawn this image on top of a 12 floor building in Friedrichshain. The battery in my computer does not last for ever, so I had to do it in several turns. I used Illustrator while I was drawing the image, and the colouring was done afterwards in Photoshop. This is an ongoing project”.

Patchwork Quilt
“This is a quilt I made for my graduation project in The Iceland Academy of the Arts. It’s based on my childhood memories and it’s made out of 10.000 pieces”.

Polar Bear & Tiger

Peter & the Wolf
“An illustration for one of my favorite children stories”.

Poster for Zoot Woman

Album Cover & Concert Poster for Gnarls Barkley

Coke Side of Life Posters: Op Art, Pop Art, Minimalism & Surrealism

Eggertsson did 4 posters for Coca-Cola (through Armchair Media). “I was playing with color and shape. Later I realized that each poster is similar to an art movement. The first one is Pop Art, the second one refers to Minimalism, third one is kind of Surrealist and the last one Op Art.”

You can see more of Eggertson’s art on his Vanillusaft website.

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Ninocka’s Coke Side of Life

Ninocka is the alter ego of Nina Ostensen-Hocevar, a self taught digital graphic designer and illustrator living and working in London/Stockholm. At the moment, Nina is working on setting up her own graphic design studio. You can see more of her work and projects on the Ninocka website:
http://www.ninocka.com

“I used the eye from my logo to create a bizarre version of the “traditional” Coke Side of Life ads”.

“I hand drew the flowers and traced them in Illustrator before playing with them in Photoshop”.

The Coke Side of Dublin

What do James Joyce, WB Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift and George Bernard Shaw all have in common? Apart from their literary talent, they all hailed from the same city, Dublin – home to writers and Ireland’s largest city.
Situated near the midpoint of Ireland’s east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey, Dublin has been Ireland’s capital since the Middle Ages.

Today, Dublin is the 3rd most visited capital in Europe. A city trip to this ancient Viking settlement allows you to explore both the historical and the hip, from castles and churches to pubs and clubs, its arts and vibrant culture, its energy and buzz. The vibrant city life brims with traditional Irish culture and trendy European cool, all set against the backdrop of its stunning coastline.
Thanks to the economic upsurge of past decade, Dublin has also grown into a true shopping & strolling paradise. Bustling street markets, ethnic cuisines and fashion shops full of designer labels have all contributed to Dublin’s newfound trendy status.

“Coke Side of Dublin” poster by Eboy.
Svend Smital, Steffen Sauerteig and Kai Vermehr founded Eboy in 1998 as a channel to explore their shared interest in pixel graphics. Ten years later, the Eboy collective is still alive and kickin’ at the forefront of the pixel art movement.

Sometimes grey weather, but always a laugh.
Photography by Kyrstin Ní Éalaithe. All rights reserved.


Coca-Cola Urban Art in the streets of Dublin.

The Coke Side of Street Life: Urban Coca-Cola Art

“El Lado Coca-Cola de Juandapo” by JGaara

“I play the street life, because there’s no place I can go. Street life, it’s the only life I know. Street life, there’s a thousand cards to play…” Remember this smashing tune by Randy Crawford?
Cities are urban jungles and art in the streets is a wild thing too. Street art and graffiti share the groove of the street and public space: this is where they hit home. The whole city becomes a medium for the street artists’ creativity and authenticity. Done with spraycans, stickers, stencils or markers, street images are often spontaneous, rough and dynamic. Not made for eternity, but to be enjoyed here & now!

“Skate Side of Coke” by Félix Lemieux

“Coke Side of My Life” by SZC

“Venus de Coca-Cola” by Bleys Of Amber.
Spray paint, stencils on paper. Based on the Venus de Milo and a sixpack of Coke.

Stefan Chinof – Typography in Action

Even though Bulgarian artist Stefan Chinof likes all kinds of illustration and techniques, he developed his typical style with typographical sketches.
There’s a refreshing side to Chinof’s experimental way of communicating. His handdrawn illustrations are a mix of bold colors, playful swirls and curls & small yet powerful statements: “Everything to Gain/Nothing to Lose/It’s a Good Day/For Shining Your Shoes/For Singing a Song/How Can Anything Be Wrong?”

Coke Side of DIY Art

It’s always great to discover spontaneous DIY versions of Coca-Cola artworks, often created using analogue techniques: pencil, Indian ink, charcoal, watercolour, gouache, …

Tribute to “Coke Side of Thailand” by Saiyukiii

Tribute to Adhemas’ “Coke Side of Life” artwork by Spring Rayne. “I had to create a pop art image for my art class & I love Coca-Cola…”

Coca-Cola Hungary – 40 Years of Happy Moments Expo

Forty years ago, Coca-Cola came to Hungary. In 1968, Coke was the first American product that made it through the Iron Curtain. To commemorate this occasion, Coca-Cola unfurled a collection of vintage pictures of “Happy Hungarians”.


“The purpose of our life is to be happy” – Dalai Lama


“Happiness in a bottle”


“Love is doing small things with great love” – Mother Teresa

Blow-up of the limited edition Coca-Cola Sziget Festival bottle, designed by the Hungarian artist Slow


Coca-Cola Art Bottles Installation


Coca-Cola Art Bottles Installation


Coca-Cola Art Bottles Installation


Coca-Cola Art Bottles Installation

Coca-Cola’s “Happy Moments” installation is part of the “Happiness Exhibition” by ARC Magazin. There are 62 original Happiness billboards and slogans plus 36 cultural posters; mind blowing work by Hungary’s most creative minds.

In 1846, the Hungarian poet Sándor Petőfi already came to the conclusion that the only happiness which is available to mankind is love: “The heart freezes if it doesn’t love”.
121 years later, John Lennon wrote “All you need is love”, a simple message to be understood by people from all over the globe.


One of the 62 billboards, showing Hungarians raising the flag of joy


This billboard reflects on the “stock market of life”


Things that make us happy (Boldogság is the Hungarian word for happiness)


Another “Happiness” billboard. A recent study shows that a smile motivated by real happiness is likely to inspire others to smile


A side exhibition showing a selection of this years cultural posters

You can visit the ARC Happiness Exhibition and Coca-Cola’s “40 Years of Happy Moments” expo at 56-osok Tere (just next to Heroes Square), Budapest, Hungary from August 28 -September 16, 2008. Entrance is free.