Grïngo, the World Wild Web Bunch

What makes a website great? Information, interactivity, freebies, … A sense of humor can help too. But what makes a website really compelling is that it’s useful, relevant & engaging for the visitors.
When Coca-Cola Brazil was looking to bring their website to the next level they put all their trust in Grïngo, an award-winning multimedia agency based in São Paulo and true visionaries in the interactive field. Over the last year, Grïngo has been creating a huge buzz for Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Light & Coca-Cola Zero with several extremely popular and anticipated projects. If you want to see flashes of genius & get some real cool web action, check out the links below. Expect the unexpected!

Coca-Cola Zero Celular

Karaokê Coca-Cola Zero

Coca-Cola Clothing Dance

Coca-Cola Light – Sabores do Mundo

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Coca-Cola Pop Art Gallery: Micha Klein, Pioneer of the Digital Image Culture

Micha Klein graduated from the Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam, in 1989 as the first artist to receive a BA in computer graphics. The same year, Klein started exhibiting his gigantic photographic panels in prestigious galleries around the world.

Klein was already known as a successful VJ and experienced a breakthrough on the international club scene before he made it as an artist. Pioneer of the VJ-scene, Micha Klein introduced his rhythmic editing of computer graphics and video images at the first Acid house parties in 1988. In the nineties, he introduced the VJ concept in Ibiza, where he held a residency in legendary club Pacha. The rest of the world would follow fast. Over the years, Klein has seen how things have technically evolved and how the VJ-scene has boomed: “The new equipment and software create new possibilities. We live in a multimedia age, so we can’t live on music alone anymore. Visuals will become an integral part of electronic culture, and in the future DJ’s will become Media Jockey’s” (note: with this 90’s quote, Micha proved to be a real visionary – anno 2008, the age of the Media Jockey has begun with tools as the Pioneer SVM 1000).

In 1998, the Groninger Museum honored him with a retrospective dedicated to 10 years of his graphic production and videos. In 2003, Klein was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to the international VJ scene during the AVIT UK summit.

Klein’s artworks are a significant crossover between art, multimedia, video art, VJing, marketing and advertising. They attract attention for their digital approach, surrealistic shapes & objects and bright colors and tell stories of a world that revisits pop art and culture. Klein doesn’t portray reality; he likes to create his own reality.
With his computer manipulated images and psychedelic computer palette, Klein explores the media based culture of our time. He mixes music, club culture, fashion, beauty and mass media to create a wondrous universe somewhere between dream and reality.

The people and landscapes in his artworks are just too beautiful & perfect. They appear unreal, even unearthly. In his series ‘Artificial Beauty’ (1998), Klein generated a new fictitious generation of beautiful young people, taking over the top the all too perfect beings and settings we encounter in advertisements.
By doing so, Klein also shows that today’s photography has no more to do with reality than other types of images. Even the most stunning models are given a Photoshop make-over. The end result is highly artificial, and comments on the aspects of society that Klein finds fascinating yet problematic such as artificial beauty and plastic surgery.

The aesthetics of advertising and elements of everyday and popular culture have always been an integrated element Klein’s art, and he brings everything that is usable over from this world. In true pop art tradition, Micha Klein is a big but critical fan of the techniques and concepts of advertising. Just like Damien Hirst, Klein believes that art must compete with commercial and spectacular expressions: “My work must be as seductive as advertising and entertainment. If not, it loses its visibility in a culture saturated by media, constantly bombarding us with commercial messages. Since these messages have become part of the mainstream culture, it is vital that artists especially can infiltrate this culture with their subversive ideas.”

Over the last years, Micha Klein has worked in clubs around the world and collaborated with superstar DJ Tiësto on visuals for his live-sets and created background projections for Eminem’s concert tour, based on his notorious character Pillman. Klein also did all the artworks for the Dutch dance festival Mysteryland, designed the animations for Jacky Chan’s ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’ movie and did commercial work for companies and brands as Swatch, Philips, Endemol, KPN, Mustang Jeans, Heineken, Hugo Boss and Samsung.

For his first Coca-Cola commercial, Micha Klein managed to put in a girl in a ‘Make Love, Not War’ T-shirt (just before the 2nd Gulf war), a boy wearing a Che Guevara T-shirt the war and girls licking each others faces. The video with music by Monte La Rue, introducing Coca-Cola’s new visual identity by Desgrippes Gobé, was sold to 25 Coca-Cola markets, a lot in Central and South America.

Klein’s commercial jobs and his works of art have a number of parallels in form & content: “It’s fun to stretch the image of a company in directions they never would imagine, to sort of pile your own layer of meaning on top of theirs, to inject some of my own ideas”.
Klein always tries to inject some of his own ideas in his commercial work. “I try to talk to the client and tell them they should transform their strategy to become a ‘good company’, to be closer to their consumers and do community projects. Give back to the people… I think in the future companies will be judged on that”.
By doing commercial assignments, Klein can finance his own art, and is not dependent on government subsidies, which gives him more freedom.

The music & club culture is still a key component in Klein’s work; at times he prefers the unceremonious gathering at clubs to the seriousness of galleries or museums.
For the Coca-Cola commercial “Bubble Dream Girl”, Klein could combine his passion for dance floors and advertising. The clip was shot in Malaga on 35mm, with a 50 people crew and 80 extras. Graphics & special effects were added in post production and his friend Tiësto did the soundtrack.

Last year (2007), ‘Speeding on the Virtual Highway’, a documentary about Micha Klein’s life & work was shown at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam. Director Corinne van Egeraat follows Klein as he works on his his new art series. This unique time document shows us how fast digital developments go and how quickly the times they are a-changin’, especially in the case of Klein’s creative way of living.

Coca-Cola Pop Art Gallery: John Clem Clarke

During the second half of the twentieth century, popular culture and the mass media gained a huge significance in American culture. Pop art that was a sign of the times: a product, a tribute to art history and critique of the social situation.
In the sixties, the New York art scene was very diverse, with people coming from different places, backgrounds and art disciplines & movements. The young John Clem Clarke was always fascinated art & advertising. He moved to New York, started painting and quickly made a name in the NYC pop art scene. Art about art is a continuous thread through Clarke’s work. His series re-working the Old Masters, such as Velasquez’s “Las Meninas” and Rembrandt’s “Night Watch” are popular icons of the late 60’s.
Clarke’s works, a mix of photo-realism and comic style with a pop art imagery. hang today in major museums as NYC’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art & Whitney Museum of American Art, Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, LA’s County Museum and Washington’s Hirshhorn Museum.

Clarke works in the pop art tradition of Andy Warhol, Jim Dine, Roy Liechtenstein & Tom Wesselmann, drawn on the graphic vocabularies of commercial modernity: “I play back and forth using unique objects and a mass-produced presentation style. You might say that ideas I express are a lot more complex than the apparently simple style I use to express them”.
Speed is vital to the freshness of John Clem Clarke’s works, and animation is the key to his style. Every line is alive, no edge is ever straight. The large size of his artworks plays an important role in the transformation of Clarke’s illustration-based style into high art.
Working on big size canvasses, his work is quite technical. The last years he uses a computer for the design phase, but before he had to work out all specific details as a sketch, use an overhead projector to project this sketches on a canvas, drew the projected image and finally paint it.” His way of working is very similar to the work of illustrators of comics or how graphic designers work today in Photoshop. Clarke: “My first layer was always the black outline. Then I painted a colored layer underneath using the line drawing as an overlay. This is the same technique Disney cartoonists used years ago. Of course, when I was developing it as my own way of working, I didn’t know that. For the actual painting, I use large stencils. I lay them onto the canvas and sponge the paint on. This way there are no brush strokes. Sometimes, I overlay the stencils so that you get the sort of effect you see when a picture isn’t printed quite right -just a little offset. I like that irregular edge”. Just like the works by Andy Warhol or Jean-Michelle Basquiat, John Clem Clarke’s oeuvre is complete with imperfections: “Instead of painting out my “mistakes”, I let them stay on the canvas as alternative solutions to the painting and to show the thought process in making a painting. It bothers me when things look too good. I like to paint and paint and paint, until I get it wrong.”

On weekends, Clarke still roams around flea and antiques markets, looking for vintage retro objects, advertising material and photographs he can use as a point of departure for his artworks. The great ads from the fifties and early sixties are a big source of inspiration: “I try to make the paintings seem as commercially produced as possible. People grew up looking at commercial illustration and print advertising, so they are comfortable with it as a visual style. I make art in a way that people find it immediately accessible”.
Clarke found his future as an artist in his past through the subject matter, themes and styles of forties, fifties & sixties. But Clarke’s works also speak of the present, the moment he creates them, by his vision & the personal touch of his brushstroke.

In the 1910s, the Coca-Cola Company ran an ad of a gorgeous woman drinking a Coke. The copy read: “Nothing is so suggestive of Coca-Cola’s own pure deliciousness as the picture of a beautiful, sweet, wholesome, womanly woman.”
Associating itself with an ideal American girl, Coca-Cola made its appeal to the public. Clarke takes this advertising concept one step further and combines the “Coca-Cola girl” billboard with the all American theme of a police car chase. His painting “Police Behind Cola Billboard” is so filmesque, that we actually wonder what will happen next…

The Space Race – To Boldly Go Where No Soda Has Gone Before…

Over 400 years ago, Sir Isaac Newton wrote in his scientific book “Principia Mathematica”: “If a leaden cannon ball is horizontally propelled by a powder charge from a cannon positioned on a hilltop, it will follow a curving flight path until it hits the ground … You can make it turn 10°, 30° and 90° before it touches the ground. You can force it to circle the Earth and even disappear into outer space, going away to infinity.”

On October 4, 1957, Newton’s hypothesis was proven correct. The Sputnik, a 183-pound shiny sphere, lifted off from the steppes of Kazahkstan, part of the former USRR. The “Space Age” had officially begun… The satellite’s prime payload was a radio transmitter sending out a harmless “beep-beep-beep” signal merely to declare its existence.
Nevertheless, the Sputnik struck fear into the hearts of Cold War Americans, who realized that the Soviets could just as well have lofted a nuclear-tipped missile to the US. Four years later, left the Soviets the USA behind in even more prestigious race. Yuri Gagarin became the first man, who orbited planet Earth in a manned spacecraft and returned home safely (the probability of a successful launch was estimated at only 50 percent, and no one even hoped that the cosmonaut would ever return).

One of the ironies of the Soviet space successes was that America’s paranoia about its technological gap led to a “first renaissance” in science education and huge investments (in the sixties, 5% of the federal budget went to space technology).
The Americans played catch-up, but initial efforts failed to make it anywhere near space and were nicknamed ‘Kaputnik” and ‘Stayputnik’ by the American press. But billions of dollars later, in 1969, the Americans emerged as victors when Neil Armstrong and Apollo 11 touched down on the moon.
In the Fifties, Russia seemed invincible in space. But finally the US won the Space Race with seven missions to the moon, while the Soviet moon program faltered.

In the years to come, the American space program would also suffer painful setbacks. On Jan. 28, 1986 , the space shuttle Challenger was destroyed 73 seconds after liftoff when rocket booster seal failed, leading to a subsequent fireball and the deaths of all seven astronauts aboard (including Christa McAuliffe, the first school teacher to launch spaceward).
Seventeen years later, another seven astronauts died when the Columbia orbiter, NASA’s oldest shuttle, broke apart during reentry on Feb. 1, 2003 after a successful 16-day science mission.
Each fatal accident grounded NASA spacecraft as the agency rooted out their causes and dealt out new safety plans before again launching astronauts into space. It took more than two years following both the Challenger and Columbia accident before NASA launched another shuttle.
The disaster occurring with the Challenger and Columbia were vivid reminders of the risks inherent to human spaceflight.

Today, the Americans and Russians have come to complement each other: NASA has been focusing on reusable transports (a fleet of space shuttles), while Russia has concentrated on studies of long-duration flight and a series of space stations.

Space programs have become so expensive, that no nation is able to conduct a space program in isolation. The former rivals are bound in space now. To make future projects happen, they have teamed up with Japan’s National Space Development Agency and the European Space Agency. Together they fill the sky with billions of dollars worth of telecommunications satellites, while a new generation of low-orbit satellite networks promises to extend and improve global communication even more.

Coca-Cola in Space

As the N°1 brand in the world, Coca-Cola always needs to stay a step ahead on the competition. To do so, no investment is spared. At the Coca-Cola Company, the motto seems to be “Dream big & make good ideas happen.” The sky is the limit – sometimes even literally.

In the late 19th century already, Coca-Cola owner Asa G. Candler put all his energy and money to break open a larger market. Candler spent huge advertising budgets on point-of-sales signs, newspapers ads, calendars, coupons & novelties, all of them prominently displaying the Coca-Cola logo. By the end of 1895, Candler could proudly proclaim that “Coca-Cola is now sold and drunk in every state of the United States”.

Robert W. Woodruff, Coke’s president from 1923 until 1954, wanted Coke to be “within arm’s reach of desire, around the world”, so he established an export department in 1926 and developed the first international bottling network.
When World War II broke out, Woodruff convinced his board of directors to make sure that no soldier had to go to war without America’s favorite drink – regardless the cost to the company. The Coke managers and technical crews had to overcome the most incredible difficulties of production and transport, but they managed to meet Woodruff’s target. At the cost of 5 Dollar cents a bottle, American GI’s could have their “Pause that refreshes” everywhere they had to go, even in the most inaccessible places or where the battle was fiercest. By the time the war was over, Coke had sold over 5 billion bottles.
Before WWII, Coca-Cola was bottled in 44 countries; by the sixties this figure had more than doubled. Coca-Cola’s bottling system was expanded to the largest and most widespread production and distribution network in the world. Coca-Cola grew into a global symbol of the American way of life.

Now that Coca-Cola was a global success story, it would take something fairly outlandish to raise eyebrows. In the eighties, CEO Roberto Goizueta had a new challenge for Coke, to boldly go where no soda has gone before… Coke’s packaging experts teamed up with NASA engineers to develop the CBDE (Carbonated Beverage Dispenser Evaluation). In 1985, astronauts tested the “Coca-Cola Space Can” aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger. The experiment was not really a success, due to the lack of refrigeration and the zero gravity conditions, but on the lighter side of space, floating “soda balls” did provide a source of entertainment for the astronauts.
Do you wonder how far New Coke did go? The STS-51F Challenger with New Coke on board traveled for 7 days, 22 hours & 45 minutes; covered a distance of 3,283,543 miles and completed 127 orbits.

Six years later, in 1991, Coca-Cola and Soviet space agency NPO Energia successfully tested an improved version of the Coca-Cola Space Can on board the Soviet space station Mir.
The 3rd trip was in 1995, this time with the Coca-Cola Space Dispenser on board (Aka the FGBA or “Fluids Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus”). The dispenser was designed to contain 1.65 liters each of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke and provide astronauts the opportunity to enjoy a refreshment break. They had to dispense their drink into a “Fluids Transfer Unit” (a sealed drinking cup) through a quick connect on the dispenser. To save power, the dispenser would chill the liquid when it was about to be consumed. As the drink passed from the storage container to the drinking can, it would flow past cooling coils that would chill it, one drink at a time. The design incorporated a unique baffle and thin vanes at its bottom to keep the liquid and carbon dioxide (CO2) from separating.

In 1996, another innovative fountain dispenser (serving Coca-Cola, diet Coke and hydration drink Powerade) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour.
Over the years, Coca-Cola made a serious investment into their space research. In addition to a desire to offer a refreshment for astronauts, Coca-Cola was also observing the effects of space flight on changes in taste perception.

Now that JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) announced its goal to build an inhabitable base on the moon by 2030, the lunar base construction workers and astronauts can be sure that their Coke will be cold & tasty, just like at home.
And if we ever find extraterrestrial life, we would not be surprised to see that the magic of Coca-Cola’s universal charisma also works in outer space.

Coke is Out of This World!

Ad campaign: Coke is out of this world!
Illustrations by Tex Grubbs / Art Director: Tanya Frank / Copywriter: Craig Moyer

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Tex Grubbs is a squirrel tamer turned Illustrator (story goes that he lost 6 of his 10 fingers to the exciting and dangerous world of squirrel taming; now he draws and paints with his mouth and feet).
He was born & raised in Dallas, Texas (yes, Tex is his real name). Tex’s passion for drawing began as a child within the pages of “Calvin & Hobbes”, “The Farside” and all things Shel Silverstein (he still reads them when he can). Tex learned stuff at the university of Texas and, most recently, at the Portfolio Center in Atlanta, Georgia. Now he spends his days drawing & painting his own pictures from his Atlanta-based studio.
To see his more of his work, take a little trip to his website or check out the “illustration” section of his blog.

Happy Halloween!

This is the time for goblins and bats,
Weird-happenings and witches brew,
Halloween spirits, ghosts and cats…

Halloween has always been a holiday filled with superstition, magic and mystery. When European immigrants came to live & work in the USA in the 2nd half of the 19th century, they brought a variation of “Hallow’s eve” traditions with them. The beliefs & customs of different nationalities mixed with local celebrations of American Indians, and soon the American version of Halloween was born. Neighbors would celebrate the harvest, lit bonfires, share spooky stories about ghost and witchcrafts, have some drinks, dance & sing.

At the turn of the century, “Hallow’s eve” aka Halloween lost most of its superstitious overtone and the fearsome and malevolent ghost -stories were replaced by parades and town-wide parties. From 1920, the centuries-old Irish practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Americans began to dress up in festive costumes and go from house to house, asking for sweets or money. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Over the years, Halloween has become a significant part of American culture. Today, Halloween is the second-largest commercial holiday in the United States (next to Christmas) with Americans spending an estimated 8.2 billion annually on candy, gifts, decoration and costumes.

The Halloween tradition of dressing in costume has ancient Celtic roots. Many centuries ago, winter was a very uncertain and frightening time. The short and cold days of winter were full of constant worry. Many people were afraid that their food supplies would not be sufficient, were afraid of the dark and frightened by the evil spirits out there. To avoid that the ghosts would recognize them, the Celts started to wear masks when they left their houses so that the mean spirits would mistake them for fellow ghosts. On Halloween, they would also place bowls of food on their doorstep, to appease the ghosts and prevent them from trying to enter their homes.

Today, most trick-or-treaters and Halloween party people have forgotten about the original traditions and beliefs. Few people really know for example when or why the pumpkin carving practice began. With the “Happy Halloween” campaign, Coca-Cola focuses on the roots of “Hallow’s eve” and brings the story of Jack O’Lantern aka “Stingy Jack” back into the spotlight.


Jack O’Lantern illustration by Daniël Maas.

Stingy Jack grew up in a small Irish village were he quickly earned the reputation of being clever as well as lazy. Instead of working, he preferred to relax under his favorite tree, a solitary oak. In order to earn an “easy shilling” to spend in the local pubs, Jack gambled and played tricks on everyone: friends, family and even his mother.
One Halloween, the time came for Jack to die and the devil arrived to take his soul. According to the Irish myth, Jack invited the devil to have a last drink together. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn’t want to pay for the drinks, so he convinced the devil to transform himself in a coin that Jack could use to pay for their drinks. The devil agreed, but Jack decided to keep this “devil coin” in his pocket next to a silver cross, preventing the devil to change back into his original shape. Jack would not let the devil free until he was promised another year of life.

The next Halloween, the devil appeared again to claim Jack’s soul, and again Jack bargained, this time challenging the devil to a game of dice, a game that he excelled at. The devil threw two ones and was about to win, but Jack used a pair of dice he had whittled himself. Jack threw two threes, forming the T-shape of a cross and once again he had the devil in his power and he bargained for more time.

The year rolled around to another Halloween. This time, Jack tricked the devil into climbing in an apple tree. Once the devil was up there, Jack hurriedly placed crosses around the trunk, making it impossible for the devil to get down. After some time, the devil came with the deal that he would never take Jack’s soul, so Jack removed the crosses and let the devil go.

Years later, death took Jack by surprise. When jack arrived in front of the gates of heaven, St. Peter would not let such an evil character enter. The devil, still upset by all the tricks that Jack had played on him, kept indeed his word and didn’t allow Jack into hell. Jack was sent back into the cold & dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack placed the coal in a hollowed out turnip, a vegetable he always carried around whenever he could steal one. From that day on, Jack and his carved-out turnip lived as a pair of inseparatable twins, the vegetable lighting Jack’s way as he roamed the earth without a resting place.

The Irish started to refer to this scary personage as “Jack of the Lantern,” and then, simply “Jack O’Lantern”. On Halloween, they carved scary faces into turnips, potatoes, rutabagas, gourds or large beets and placed them in front of their houses to scare away Stingy Jack and ward off other evil spirits. European immigrants brought the Stingy Jack tradition with them when they moved to the US. They quickly discovered that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, were bigger and easier to carve out. So they started to use pumpkins, making perfect Jack O’Lanterns.

DOWNLOAD THE COCA-COLA “HAPPY HALLOWEEN” WALLPAPERS HERE:

Halloween is coming. Carve some pumpkins, take the torches, cauldrons, masks & skeletons from the closet & dress up as Batman, a candy corn witch, devil grrrl, clone trooper or a black widow. And what is Halloween without a scary Halloween wallpaper on your desktop? You can download these free Coca-Cola Art “Happy Halloween” wallpapers by clicking on the link under the artwork. The Coke Art Halloween wallpapers are available in 600×800, 1024×768 and 1280×960 screen resolution sizes.

Please read our Terms of Use before downloading any wallpapers from the Coca-Cola Art Gallery website.

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola-Art_Halloween1.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola-Art_Halloween2.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola-Art_Halloween3.zip

How to install? FireFox Users: Right-click your mouse on the Coca-Cola Art wallpaper and select “Set As Desktop Background”. Then click on the “Set Desktop Background” button. Internet Explorer Users: Right-click your mouse on the Coke Art wallpaper and select “Set As Background”. Mac Users: Drag and drop the Coca-Cola Art wallpaper onto your desktop. Do this by clicking your mouse on the Halloween wallpaper, hold down the button while you drag your mouse onto your desktop, then release the mouse button. Your desktop will have to be visible on your screen so you can drag your mouse onto it. And in the meantime, keep an eye out for these spooky pumpkins!

The Coca-Cola Halloween wallpapers (all artworks, illustrations, graphic designs, photo footage & images) are for personal use only.

“Coca-Cola” ®, “Coke” ®, the “Dynamic Ribbon Device” ® and the design of the “Coca-Cola Contour Bottle” ® are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company. © The Coca-Cola Company, 2008 – All rights reserved.

Coca-Cola Art Gallery Wallpapers: Music & Nightlife Themes

Give your desktop an all new Coke Art look! If you are getting bored with your current wallpaper, we’ve got some cool & exclusive Coca-Cola artworks to spice up your desktop. The Coca-Cola Art Gallery contains 12 specially designed free wallpapers by various famous artists and graphic designers.
You can download this collection of high quality Coca-Cola Music & Nightlife wallpapers by clicking on the link under the artwork. The Coke Art wallpapers come in a range of popular formats, featuring 600×800, 1024×768 and 1280×960 resolutions. If you want the wallpaper in standard 1024×768 format, you can also drag and drop the image to your desktop.

Please read our Terms of Use before downloading any artworks from the Coca-Cola Art Gallery website.

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife1.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife2.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife3.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife4.zip

This zip contains both versions of the Coca-Cola Art wallpapers: http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife5.zip

The zip contains the 2 versions of the Coke Art Gallery wallpapers: http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife5.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife7.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife8.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife9.zip

http://www.popandroll.com/Coca-Cola_Nightlife10.zip

You can download more creative, beautiful & exclusive Coca-Cola Music & Summer Festival wallpapers here.

The Coke Art Music & Nightlife wallpapers (all artworks, graphic designs, illustrations, images & photo footage) are for personal use only.

“Coca-Cola” ®, “Coke” ®, the “Dynamic Ribbon Device” ® and the design of the “Coca-Cola Contour Bottle” ® are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company. © The Coca-Cola Company, 2008 – All rights reserved. Graphic Design by RockAndRoll Agency © 2005-2008.